The March Madness starts

The first stirrings of spring and rather than bunnies going crazy, this is the good stuff we are looking at this week.

 

An Amazon employee inadvertently took down part of the internet

It transpired that the laddie(has got be a lad, thinking woolly thoughts), working on an issue accidentally switched off more computer servers than intended at 9:37 a.m. Seattle time, resulting in errors that cascaded through the company’s S3 service, Amazon said in a statement Thursday. S3 is used to house data, manage apps and software downloads by nearly 150,000 sites, including ESPN.com and aol.com, according to SimilarTech.com. [More]

For all those of us in need for a little buck me up this week, take a look at these nice TED talks.

7 TED Talks That Will Inspire You to Succeed

Everyone wants to succeed, but not everyone knows how to succeed.

There are many things that will help us go the distance, but few are as empowering and inspiring as a TED Talk.

Listening to a TED Talk is a great way to gain information, discover new sources of innovation, and jump-start your life toward success.

Here are some that are especially powerful with wonderful takeaways. [More]

The MVP is dead. Long live the RAT.

There is a flaw at the heart of the term Minimum Viable Product: it’s not a product. It’s a way of testing whether you’ve found a problem worth solving. A way to reduce risk and quickly test your biggest assumption. Instead of building an MVP identify your Riskiest Assumption and Test it. Replacing your MVP with a RAT will save you a lot of pain.[More]

 

Some nice books for the week:

Given how much the Kohinoor is talked about, it is surprising that it has taken so long for the history of the gem to be written. That, however, may have been for the best, as the delay has led to Kohinoor: The Story of the World’s Most Infamous Diamond – a beautifully written, engrossing story about the undesirable fate of conquerors entranced by a small, lustrous ancient stone.

The authors go all the way to Tasmania to experience the thylacine or lack thereof in the beautiful wilds of this island. The challenges to wildlife and the human experience around the very unique creatures, like the Tasmanian Devil is delightfully explained in this book.

 

Well! I bought this one because Steve Bannon was reading it right after the election. Before going off on a rant, please do read it because it is written by a journalist who really deeply cares about the Vietnam War and the danger of an over exuberant and too proactive presidency taking us down the path to ruin. The book is really a list of the character sketches of all the people involved and literally reads like a greek tragedy. It was almost inevitable if you put all these bright people in one heady room.

 

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